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Call Us

(02) 8006 2910

Opening Hours

Mon-Fri: 9:00am - 7:00pm

Book Appointment

Make an appointment now.

The absolute worst foods and drinks that damage your teeth

It’s no secret that highly acidic and sugary foods and drinks are vilified by dentists who seem them as nothing but a sinister liability for your dental health. Unfortunately, our society is dominated by corporations that sell us these products and encourage them as treats or rewards for children.

This has created a consumerist culture that goes through a lot of processed foods with lots of additives in them. For dentists, this has created a nightmare that leads to species-wide tooth decay.

Those of us who are concerned about their health and the health of their teeth would do well to identify and avoid these problem food and drinks. Let’s take a look at the absolute worst food and drinks that cause tooth decay.

Sour candy

Most people know that candy is bad for your teeth, but not all know that sour candy is the worst offender. The acids found in sour candy are a much more potent chemical cocktail that sticks longer to the teeth because of how chewy the food is.

If you’re craving sweetness, choose block chocolate instead. It isn’t sticky and can be washed away easily after consumption.

Bread

Yes, bread is bad for your teeth. You’d be surprised to know that our saliva breaks down bread starches into sugars that coat our teeth. The paste-like bread that’s chewed up in your mouth can find its way in-between teeth, leading to cavities.

When looking at bread options, consider whole wheat alternatives as they have fewer sugars and don’t break down in saliva as easily.

Alcohol

We know that alcohol isn’t a healthy diet choice that should be consumed daily, but the reality is that most people want to enjoy alcohol regardless. Alcohol dries out the mouth so that there is less saliva to prevent food particles sticking to teeth.

This is why it is recommended to drink water in-between alcoholic beverages and it also helps prevent hangovers too.

Soft drinks

Soft drinks are probably the biggest cause of tooth decay in modern diets and it’s easy to see why. People will actively drink a 600ml bottle soft drink with their meals as if this is a normal behaviour.

Some studies have even shown that drinking soft drinks in quantity can be as damaging for your teeth as hard drug use. Soft drinks cause plaque to attack the enamel of the tooth with more acid.

Contrary to what some believe, cleaning your teeth right after drinking soft drinks will not negate the damage caused. It can actually cause the damage to be worse if you brush your teeth while the acid is taking effect.